An overview of Continuing Professional Development in physiotherapy (2022)

Table of Contents
Article preview Physiotherapy Abstract Objectives Data sources Review methods Results Conclusion Introduction Section snippets Search strategy History of CPD Mandatory versus voluntary CPD Types of CPD Benefits of CPD Effect of CPD: the evidence The evidence for CPD in physiotherapy Barriers to CPD Cost of CPD CPD: the future Conclusion Acknowledgements References (71) Physiotherapy Physiotherapy Physiotherapy Aust J Physiother Aust J Physiother Continuing professional development: a review Nurs Stand The effectiveness of continuing professional development Learning preferences and cognitive style: some implications for continuing professional development Manage Learn Record your professional experience Physiother Frontline Continuing professional development Physiother Ireland Continuing professional postgraduate education: overview and issues NZ J Adult Learn Obselesence or lifelong education: a choice for the professional Am Psychol Continuing professional development Pharma J Mandatory practice self-appraisal: moving towards outcomes based continuing education J Eval Clin Prac Mandatory continuing education—a survey of current activity. A special communication Phys Ther Continuing education: should it become compulsory for practising physiotherapists? NZ J Physiother Respiratory therapists’ attitudes toward recredentialing J All Health Mandatory continuing education in physical therapy: survey of physical therapists in states with and states without a mandate Phys Ther Variables influencing physical therapists’ perceptions of continuing education Phys Ther Continuing medical education and continuing professional development: international comparisons BMJ The professional development portfolio—a record of lifelong learning Physiother Ireland Continuing professional development: a survey of Irish staff grade physiotherapists Int J Ther Rehabil Do physiotherapists attitudes towards evidence based practice change as a result of an evidence based educational programme J Eval Clin Pract Cited by (50) Recommended articles (6) FAQs Videos
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Physiotherapy

Volume 94, Issue 3,

September 2008

, Pages 190-197

Author links open overlay panelH.P.FrenchaPersonEnvelopeJ.Dowdsbon behalf of the Dublin Academic Teaching Hospitals Physiotherapy CPD Project Group

Abstract

Objectives

To review the role of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) within physiotherapy, its historical background, types of CPD, effectiveness, and the barriers that limit participation in and implementation of CPD; and to identify areas of future development in CPD in physiotherapy from a research and practice perspective.

Data sources

Medical database searches of MEDLINE (1966–2006), CINAHL (1982–2006) and Cochrane Library, as well as searches of educational journals and websites of physiotherapy professional bodies.

Review methods

Selection included experimental designs from case studies to randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, observational longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, literature reviews and discussion papers in physiotherapy and other healthcare-related fields. Only English-language articles were included.

Results

The historical background of CPD is outlined and the debate around mandatory and voluntary CPD is discussed. The ultimate aim of CPD is to improve healthcare delivery and patient care, but measurement of this is limited in physiotherapy so much of the information is extrapolated from medical and nursing studies. Systematic reviews have identified that interactive formal CPD and critical appraisal have some evidence of effect on clinician behaviour and health outcomes. In physiotherapy, the evidence to date demonstrates little benefit of formal courses. There is an absence of research into informal activities.

Conclusion

CPD is becomingly increasingly important in physiotherapy and is mandatory in many countries. A wide range of formal and informal physiotherapy CPD activities exist, with limited research into their effect on practice behaviour or health outcomes. With a number of evolving areas in physiotherapy, areas for potential research and issues that require consideration for CPD in the future are identified.

Introduction

The delivery of health care, including physiotherapy, is concerned with quality and accountability. There is a demand on healthcare professionals to critically review their skills and knowledge, and continuously keep up to date with changes in practice. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is central to this process. Considerable variation exists in the interpretation of the term ‘CPD’ [1]. Other terms such as ‘lifelong learning’ and ‘continuing education’ are used synonymously with ‘CPD’. Continuing education represents a more didactic, passive style of education, whilst CPD implies a learner-centred and self-directed approach to learning [2]. Sadler-Smith et al. [3] identified three functions of CPD. The maintenance role fosters the notion of lifelong learning, the survival role requires practitioners to demonstrate ongoing competence, and the mobility role aims to increase employability. In physiotherapy, CPD includes areas of personal and professional development that should begin from commencement of undergraduate education [4]. It incorporates clinical proficiency as well as non-clinical activities such as information technology, management, leadership and communication skills. It is dependent on the ability to critically evaluate through clinical reasoning and reflection [5].

This article aims to review the role of CPD within the physiotherapy profession, outline the historical background to CPD, evaluate the effectiveness of CPD at an individual and organisational level, and report the barriers that limit the participation in and implementation of CPD, and issues that should be addressed for the future.

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Section snippets

Search strategy

A comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1966–2006), CINAHL (1982–2006) and Cochrane Library was conducted. Educational journals such as Learning in Health and Social Care, Medical Education and BMC Medical Education were also searched. Subject headings searched were: ‘Continuing Professional Development’; ‘lifelong learning’; ‘CPD’; ‘continuing education’; and ‘mandatory CPD’. Subject headings were combined with ‘physiotherapy’, ‘physical therapy’ and ‘rehabilitation’. The websites of professional

History of CPD

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, it became apparent that undergraduate education did not fully prepare an individual for working life or imply lifelong competence [6]. Dubin [7] proposed the half-life concept to estimate the extent of becoming out of date with new technology and knowledge. A half-life of 5 years was applied to medicine and engineering, whilst 10–12 years was applied to psychologists. Most of the literature of this era used the terminology of continuing education. Mandatory

Mandatory versus voluntary CPD

There has been much debate about whether CPD in physiotherapy should be mandatory or voluntary [21], [22], [23]. Mandatory CPD is where a minimum requirement for CPD is established [23]. Grant [9] suggested that there is a lack of clear-cut evidence that mandatory CPD results in improved competence or change in practice. Mandatory CPD administered by a professional body provides a duty to the public to ensure competence in their members [23], and is a more acceptable method of ensuring

Types of CPD

CPD is more than attending courses and undertaking postgraduate study. It also occurs on the job through day-to-day experiences, performance reviews, journal clubs, peer discussion, in-service training, critical reading and personal reflection [30]. Clinical supervision, lecturing, clinical teaching, writing reports, significant incident analysis and research are also identified as CPD activities [17]. Two surveys found that courses, in-service training [31], [32], clinical training and

Benefits of CPD

The ultimate goal of CPD is to deliver better patient care [38] and improve health care for the public [39]. According to Du Boulay [40], ‘through CPD we can achieve personal and professional growth, develop, acquire and refine the skills needed for new roles and responsibilities’. Much of the research is based on low-level evidence of self-report surveys. Motivation for undertaking CPD includes improved patient care, intellectual challenge, need for updating, provision of evidence of

Effect of CPD: the evidence

CPD is only effective as long as practice change occurs [38]. However, in addition to overt practice benefits, more subtle benefits occur such as greater assertiveness and autonomy, better competence and exchange of ideas [39], [40]. It is easier to measure how many people undertake CPD and self-report a response than how effective it is on practice or patient outcomes [1].

Systematic reviews of education strategies that objectively measured clinician performance and/or healthcare outcomes have

The evidence for CPD in physiotherapy

Few studies have objectively assessed the impact of CPD on physiotherapy practice. Mays [51] evaluated change in practice at 2 weeks and 6 months following a 3-day course in neurodevelopment. Thirty therapists were divided into a control group and an experimental group. Change was measured in three ways: self-report (n=30); independent review of patient records (n=10); and direct observation by an independent therapist (n=10). The self-report method demonstrated significant change in practice,

Barriers to CPD

Nolan et al. [38] identified barriers to CPD that exist broadly at two levels: those that inhibit the uptake of education; and those that inhibit subsequent practice change. The literature highlights a number of barriers to conducting CPD across healthcare disciplines, including time [56], [57], [58], [59], finances [39], [56], staff shortage, family commitments [58], and lack of encouragement from managers [56].

Barriers may also depend on the CPD activity. Barriers to postgraduate study

Cost of CPD

Individuals contribute extra time and effort and endure considerable strain in undertaking CPD [63]. A systematic review found seven cost-effectiveness and two cost-benefit analyses studies of CPD, with many of the studies being inadequate to determine the most effective mode of CPD [64].

In the UK, total NHS spending on CPD in 1999–2000 was £1 billion [64], whilst in 2003–2004, spending on CPD for nurses and allied health professionals was approximately £13.4 million [65]. This huge financial

CPD: the future

Internationally, the physiotherapy profession is undergoing dramatic change with the creation of advanced roles such as extended scope practitioners, consultant physiotherapists and clinical specialists [66]. There is increased demand and opportunity for specialisation in physiotherapy [67], which requires a formal process for qualification [68]. It is therefore intrinsically linked with CPD. Expertise is developed by reflecting on personal experience over time [69]; however, being an expert

Conclusion

CPD is an essential role of the physiotherapist to ensure delivery of high-quality patient care. There is a trend towards professional bodies regulating for a minimum requirement of CPD to ensure competence of their members to practice. CPD comprises a range of formal and informal activities that are an integral part of a physiotherapist's work. Traditional methods of CPD, such as formal courses, are no longer considered to be the only form of CPD. Many professional bodies recognise informal

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Professor Marie Guidon, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin and Ciara Cassidy, St James’ Hospital, Dublin for their valuable comments on the manuscript. The Dublin Academic Teaching Hospitals Physiotherapy CPD Project Group: Grace Cooke and Mary Cassells, Adelaide, Meath Hospital (incorporating the National Children's Hospital), Dublin; Anne Marie Keown and Sarianne Farrell, Mater Misercordiae University Hospital, Dublin; Ann Marie O’Grady, Michelle Shannon

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      Participants were stratified and randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups. The control group participated in a two-day workshop dedicated towards the management of neck disorders. The intervention group completed the two-day workshop and attended a five-hour follow-up session one month later. Outcome measures included self-reported physiotherapist practice behaviour and confidence, as well as patient clinical outcomes using the Neck Disability Index.

      While all participants exhibited changes in confidence and practice behaviours, between-group differences were not significant for any response (p>0.05). There were also no significant differences between the groups in terms of patient outcomes (Neck Disability Index: F=0.36, p=0.56).

      A single follow-up session to a traditional workshop is insufficient to significantly influence practice behaviours or patient outcomes.

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      Grossman and Salas in their key reference identified three main characteristics that represent training inputs and hence impact on the outcome for the transfer of skills: trainee characteristics, training design and work environment [13]. Barriers to knowledge transfer from these three characteristics include low motivation of the trainees, training design that ignores the divide between academics and practitioners [9] and an unsupportive work place. The weight and relevance of these characteristics can be assessed by program designers relative to any program.

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      The outcome was an over-arching theme: Expanding Options, supported by six categories that emerged from the data: Choice of Tools; Managing Time; Patient Selection, Developing Support Networks; Learning ‘AT Stillness’ and Building Trust & Confidence. The results were presented at a focus group type workshop on the post-graduate course.

      The themes generated may be applied to other training programs. However, the limitation of the small data set, the specific nature of the course and that it teaches in an area that generates controversy within the osteopathic profession need to be recognised when reflecting on the utility of outcome.

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    FAQs

    What can you say about continuing professional development? ›

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is a combination of approaches, ideas and techniques that will help you manage your own learning and growth. The focus of CPD is firmly on results – the benefits that professional development can bring you in the real world.

    What is Continuing professional development physiotherapy? ›

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is the process by which professionals maintain and develop their skills, knowledge and competence in order to practice safely and effectively. Use the FAQs on this page to learn more about what continuing professional development (CPD) means for physiotherapy staff.

    What are your views about continuing professional development? ›

    CPD provides a panoramic view of an individual's skill set, enabling them to hone their prevalent skills while improving those that require work. Ultimately, continual upskilling boosts confidence and empowers the individual to become more proficient in their role.

    What CPD is required for physiotherapy? ›

    What CPD Can a Physiotherapist Do? A Physiotherapist must complete 30 hours of formal CPD per year. However, members of the CSP can also elect to complete informal CPD monthly, with protected learning time.

    Why CPD is important for my own development? ›

    The CPD process helps you manage your own development on an ongoing basis. Its function is to help you record, review and reflect on what you learn. It's not a tick-box document recording the training you have completed.

    What are the benefits of continuing professional development? ›

    Benefits of continuous professional development
    • Improves intellect, personal skills and confidence;
    • Opens doors to excellent future employment opportunities;
    • Improves learning ability;
    • Promotes independent learning;
    • Demonstrates ambition and commitment to professional self-improvement;
    22 Mar 2019

    How many CPD points do I need Hcpc? ›

    We don't set a number of hours or points and we do not 'approve' or 'endorse' any CPD activity. The choice of appropriate activities is up to the individual. We are much more interested in the outcomes of their learning, how this has benefitted their practice and ultimately the service users.

    What is a CPD portfolio? ›

    What is a CPD portfolio? A portfolio is a tool to support you to meet a range of requirements linked to your CPD. It captures what activities you have done and when you did them. It also shows what you learnt by doing them and how such learning has affected your practice.

    What is CPD registration? ›

    Continuing professional development (CPD) is the way in which registrants continue to learn and develop throughout their careers so they keep their skills and knowledge up to date and are able to practise safely and effectively.

    What are the key characteristics of good CPD? ›

    The evaluation focuses on the five core features of effective CPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, and collective participation.

    How do you go about continuing to develop your professional skills and knowledge? ›

    Develop your skills
    1. Get training. Attend a workshop, take a course, read an article or book, observe someone who excels at the skill. ...
    2. Practice. Consider ways you can deliberately.
    3. Get feedback. Assess your progress, identifying areas where you have improved and areas for continued growth.

    What is the purpose of professional development? ›

    The purpose of professional development is to improve knowledge and skills in order to facilitate individual, school-wide, and district-wide improvements for the purpose of increasing student achievement.

    What do the HCPC say about CPD? ›

    CPD is not only formal courses but any activity from which you learn and develop. – CPD is a requirement of your registration, so you need to meet our CPD standards to stay registered. You need to do the following. – Carry out regular CPD and keep a record of what you do in the way that is most convenient for you.

    How do I organize my CPD folder? ›

    keep them in one folder. Where possible digitise them as you go along and store with the relevant write up. If you don't digitise it, document on your write up where you have kept the evidence. This way you will remember where it is when you come to collate it at a later date.

    What is CPD and CEU? ›

    If your industry requires that you earn CPD (Continuing Professional Development) or CEU (Continuing Education Unit) credit hours, you can elect to receive confirmation of the credit hours you have earned for the certification courses you complete through AIGPE™.

    Why are CPD points important? ›

    These points assign value to continual personal development endeavours undertaken, with the number of CPD points earned being a clear way to demonstrate the time invested in your professional training – to your current employer, job recruiters and hiring managers. They are important for career progression.

    Why is CPD important for clients? ›

    Keeping Skills and Knowledge Up-to-Date

    In some sectors, this could occur in just a matter of years. CPD accredited training consistently provides the latest information to make sure learners are informed of the most recent developments, practices and data.

    Why is continuing professional development important in healthcare? ›

    Personal and professional development helps manage your own learning and growth throughout your career. Continuous learning helps open up new doors in your career, keep your skills and knowledge up to date and ensure you practice safely and legally.

    Are CPD points required 2021? ›

    Do they require CPD points for Civil Engineers? A. Yes, but you may sign an undertaking that is only available until December 31, 2021. By 2022, you will be required to renew with the earned CPD points.

    How many CPD hours do I need for revalidation? ›

    As part of your revalidation, you must undertake 35 hours of continuing professional development (CPD) relevant to your scope of practice as a nurse, nursing associate or midwife over the three years prior to your revalidation date.

    How many CPD points do I have? ›

    This is a requirement for many professional bodies. For example, the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors requires its members to collect 20 CPD points each year. Knowing that CPD points are important is one thing, knowing what they actually are is vital.

    Is a CPD a Recognised qualification? ›

    CPD is a recognised qualification that confirms your learning has met the necessary Continuing Professional Development standards and benchmarks. Whereas an NVQ (National Vocational Qualification) is a vocational qualification based on national occupational standards.

    What is CPD cycle? ›

    The CPD cycle is a cyclical process and your learning is continuously evolving. However, it's important to identify what learning you want and/or need, that supports your aspirations and plan how you'll do this.

    What is continuous professional development PDF? ›

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is the action we take to maintain, update and grow the knowledge and skills required for our professional role. As the name suggests, it is an ongoing commitment, lasting for as long as we remain within our profession.

    Do CPD certificates expire? ›

    The accreditation of CPD Provider is valid for three (3) years.

    Is CPD Recognised internationally? ›

    Due to the research undertaken by the CPD Standards Research Project with various professional bodies and regulators the accreditation is recognised and respected internationally.

    Can CPD points be used towards a degree? ›

    Studying a course or taking part in an activity that is CPD certified will count towards your Continuing Professional Development hours. So, for example, if you want to improve your financial skills, studying a Level 2 Diploma in Accounting would not only improve your skillset but also count towards your CPD hours.

    What are four 4 Features of a good professional development plan? ›

    Regardless, there are always 5 elements that every professional development plan should include. They are assessment, goals, resources, strategy, and evaluation.

    What is the main feature of effective professional development? ›

    The key features of effective PD include (a) content, (b) active learning, (c) coherence, (d) duration of programs and (e) collective participants (see Birman et al., 2000; DeMonte, 2013; Desimone, 2009; Sokel, 2019).

    What are the features of good professional development? ›

    Features of effective PD programs that improve student outcomes are well established (Darling-Hammond et al., 2017; Desimone, 2009) and include a focus on content; incorporation of active learning, collaboration, modeling best practice, consistency with teachers' knowledge and beliefs, use of coaching and expert ...

    What are the 3 most important areas of development for you professionally? ›

    7 Key employee development areas
    • Flexibility.
    • Communication skills.
    • Bonus: Conflict Resolution, Tactfulness, Work ethic.
    • Leadership Skills.
    • Organizational Skills.
    • Creativity Skills.
    • Bonus: Stress Management.
    30 Dec 2021

    How do you plan to continue to grow your skills in your current role? ›

    How to develop new skills
    • Set goals for yourself. ...
    • Find a mentor. ...
    • Seek feedback about strengths and weaknesses. ...
    • Review job descriptions for positions you want. ...
    • Enroll in an online degree program. ...
    • Take continuing education courses in career-related fields. ...
    • Take advantage of company training. ...
    • Participate in job shadowing.

    How do you answer what skills do you want to improve? ›

    Consider these tips when developing your answer about skills you want to improve:
    1. Be honest. Tell the truth in your response and express your honest desires for improving your skills.
    2. Be humble. ...
    3. Express an eagerness to learn. ...
    4. Highlight skills you have. ...
    5. Use a professional example.

    What is the impact of professional development? ›

    Professional development will give you the skills and knowledge you need to lead your team properly and will enhance your professional reputation, thus attracting qualified candidates to your company.

    What is examples of professional development? ›

    Learning new abilities, earning certifications, gaining more experience in a specific field, moving forward in your company, and pursuing any other career aspirations are all examples of professional development goals.

    What are the benefits of personal and professional development? ›

    5 Benefits of Professional Development
    • Increase Retention. ...
    • Build confidence and credibility. ...
    • Make succession planning easier. ...
    • Re-energize your staff. ...
    • Improved efficiency.

    What are the standards of CPD? ›

    The CPD Standards are: A registrant must maintain a continuous, up-to-date, accurate and reflective record of their CPD activities and be able to provide supporting evidence if requested. A registrant must demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.

    How do I know if I am selected for HCPC audit? ›

    If you are selected for audit, you'll be notified by email within 10 working days of the renewal window opening. You will also see this notice via your online account.

    Is Continuing professional development CPD a necessary requirement for all physiotherapists? ›

    Wherever you are in your physiotherapy career, developing and maintaining a personal portfolio is an absolute must, and once qualified, your CPD portfolio will be used to evidence your fitness to practise. The HCPC requires all physios to maintain a record of CPD activities.

    What are the three types of CPD? ›

    Types of CPD
    • Structured CPD / Active Learning. Structured CPD typically involves interactive and participation-based study. ...
    • Reflective CPD / Passive Learning. ...
    • Informal CPD / Self-Directed Learning.

    What counts towards CPD hours? ›

    Activities such as on the job learning, projects, problem solving, research, conferences, mentoring, volunteering, technical learning, management training and so much more – all count as valid CPD.

    What CPD does a physiotherapist need? ›

    Physiotherapists are required to undertake 30 hours of CPD each year, of which they must keep a record of for the Health and Care Professions Council.

    How does CPD help progression in learning? ›

    CPD enables learning to become conscious and proactive, rather than passive and reactive – this is mediated by the incorporation of vocational, practical into academic qualifications. It's an important part of continually making personal improvements even after finishing formal education.

    How do I get a CPD certificate? ›

    How to become a CPD provider
    1. Apply for CPD accreditation online using our form. Please use our simple Become CPD Accredited form and provide us with some brief information about your organisation, training and events.
    2. We will contact you to discuss your CPD. ...
    3. Submit your learning for CPD certification.

    How do you go about continuing to develop your professional skills and knowledge? ›

    Develop your skills
    1. Get training. Attend a workshop, take a course, read an article or book, observe someone who excels at the skill. ...
    2. Practice. Consider ways you can deliberately.
    3. Get feedback. Assess your progress, identifying areas where you have improved and areas for continued growth.

    Why is it important to continually update your knowledge skills and practice? ›

    Gaining confidence. With the knowledge that you've gained additional skills to take you forward in your career, you will feel more ready to take on challenges or new opportunities. Career development. Learning new skills can lead to future promotions or extensions beyond your current job role.

    How do you maintain your own professional development as a teacher? ›

    Keys to Improving Teacher Professional Development
    1. Focus on Feedback and Reflection. To improve professional development for teachers, there must be clear focus on the groups attending and what their needs are. ...
    2. Model Best Practices. ...
    3. Set Relevant Goals. ...
    4. Make it Interactive.
    10 Sept 2019

    What are the 3 most important areas of development for you professionally? ›

    7 Key employee development areas
    • Flexibility.
    • Communication skills.
    • Bonus: Conflict Resolution, Tactfulness, Work ethic.
    • Leadership Skills.
    • Organizational Skills.
    • Creativity Skills.
    • Bonus: Stress Management.
    30 Dec 2021

    How do you plan to continue to grow your skills in your current role? ›

    How to develop new skills
    • Set goals for yourself. ...
    • Find a mentor. ...
    • Seek feedback about strengths and weaknesses. ...
    • Review job descriptions for positions you want. ...
    • Enroll in an online degree program. ...
    • Take continuing education courses in career-related fields. ...
    • Take advantage of company training. ...
    • Participate in job shadowing.

    How do you answer what skills do you want to improve? ›

    Consider these tips when developing your answer about skills you want to improve:
    1. Be honest. Tell the truth in your response and express your honest desires for improving your skills.
    2. Be humble. ...
    3. Express an eagerness to learn. ...
    4. Highlight skills you have. ...
    5. Use a professional example.

    Why is it important to engage in professional development? ›

    A wealth of new knowledge will come from actively participating in professional development courses. Attending professional development courses will increase your expertise in your field and, as a result, build confidence in the work you do.

    What is the purpose of professional development? ›

    The purpose of professional development is to improve knowledge and skills in order to facilitate individual, school-wide, and district-wide improvements for the purpose of increasing student achievement.

    Why do you think professional development is important? ›

    Employees will also become better workers through professional development. By learning the right skills for their career, employees will be more productive and efficient, thus helping the business for which they work succeed. Finally, professional development can open the doors to new opportunities for employees.

    What are examples of professional development? ›

    Professional Development Examples
    • Continuing Education.
    • Participation in professional organizations.
    • Research.
    • Improve job performance.
    • Increased duties and responsibilities.
    • Approaches to professional development:
    • Skill Based Training.
    • Job Assignments.

    How can I improve my professional practice? ›

    CHCPRP003 – Reflect On and Improve Own Professional Practice
    1. Self-evaluate your knowledge and skills.
    2. Seek and reflect upon feedback from co-workers and clients.
    3. Provide feedback to co-workers.
    4. Identify how the values, beliefs and behaviours influence your practice.

    What are three types of professional development? ›

    Common areas of professional development.
    • Technical Training. Developing technical, quantitative, and analytical skills can help you analyze student-performance data and then use the findings to make modifications to your curriculum or teaching techniques.
    • Specialized Training. ...
    • Leadership Development. ...
    • Classroom Management.
    26 Feb 2021

    Videos

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    2. Critical Analysis | Continuing Professional Development
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    4. Global Specialist Physiotherapy - Professional Development, Formal Mentoring and Second Opinions
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    6. Physiotherapy Webinar Club From CPD Solutions
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